ANGELS and TODDLING BOATS

https://teresa-mystack.blogspot.ie/2015/12/the-conscious-mind-of-emily-dickinson.html#more
There is an occurrence in Emily Dickinson's verse, beyond mere coincidence or unaware habit.

There is a possibility that some at least of the people who dislike and criticize Emily Dickinson’s poetry are not aware of her linguistic devices. With the knowledge, the poetry gives a different impression.

It is a very favorable impression, in my case. An occurrence in Emily Dickinson’s verse is beyond mere coincidence or unaware habit. Noticed, it helps see her inspiration with Greek and Latin.

Time and Eternity, XVIII, PLAYMATES; Latin: collusor, companion at play; condiscipulus, school-mate; angelus, a messenger, an angel; lapillus, small stone, pebble (marble?); lusus, a game; Greek: ὁμηλυσία, omelusia, companionship.

God permits industrious angels
Afternoons to play.
I met one, — forgot my school-mates,
All, for him, straightway.

God calls home the angels promptly
At the setting sun;
I missed mine. How dreary marbles,
After playing Crown!

The inspiration is MORPHO-PHONEMIC. Let us try a few more pieces.

Life, XXIII, UNRETURNING; Greek: ἀνάπλυσις, anaplusis, washing or rinsing out; ἀνήλυσις, anelusis, going up, return; ἤλυσις, elusis, step, gait; Latin: lenunculus, a small sailing-vessel, bark, skiff (the toddling little boat).

‘T was such a little, little boat
That toddled down the bay!
‘T was such a gallant, gallant sea
That beckoned it away!

‘T was such a greedy, greedy wave
That licked it from the coast;
Nor ever guessed the stately sails
My little craft was lost!

IMAGE: EMILY DICKINSON'S FIRST SERIES, FREE EPUB
Free e-book, Emily Dickinson’s First Series, with a thematic stanza, notes on her Greek and Latin inspiration, and more; 203 electronic pages, Creative Commons Attribution 2.5.
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EMILY DICKINSON, FIRST SERIES.
We can compare the Greek -upo/ypo- for I ASKED NO OTHER THING.

Life, XII; Latin: cauponarius, a male shopkeeper, tradesman; Greek: ἰσότυπος, isotypos, shaped alike, συνυπόπτωσις, synypoptosis, simultaneous presentation to the senses; ποπτερνίς, upopternis, a knob (a button that can twirl), and πo, below, looking a picture up and down (as Brazil on a map).

I asked no other thing,
No other was denied.
I offered Being for it;
The mighty merchant smiled.

Brazil? He twirled a button,
Without a glance my way:
“But, madam, is there nothing else
That we can show to-day?”

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